AALS Panel- New Voices in International Human Rights

The AALS Section on Human Rights will introduce the work of 34 scholars who will be presenting papers either for the first time at an AALS Conference, or for the first time in the area of human rights.  This is admittedly a bit of self-promotion as I will be presenting on Panel #3 on Sunday January 6, 2008 in the Clinton Suite of the Hilton.  My presentation is entitled “Toward a Predictive Theory of Executive Forum Discretion in Counterterrorism.”  In the coming days I’ll post a draft of the paper for comments, but in the meantime I wanted to ensure that the entire conference announcement was posted.

New Voices in International Human Rights

The Association of American Law Schools Section on Human Rights will introduce the work of 34 scholars who will be presenting papers either for the first time at an AALS Conference, or for the first time in the area of human rights.  Speakers were selected from a call for papers, and the panels include new law professors and promising future academic stars.  The first part of the program will be on Friday, January 4, 2008.  The second and third parts will be in two concurrent panels on Sunday, January 6, 2008, from 9:00 a.m. to noon.  The AALS Section on New Law Professors is an additional sponsor of the third part of this program.

We invite you to attend as many of these presentations as you can.  Obviously you cannot attend them all.  But your support of new scholars in the field of international human rights law will have a positive impact and help improve the quality of future scholarly writings to define, promote, and defend human rights.  When you are at the meeting in New York, you might also drop a note of support to colleagues and other persons whose presentations are of particular interest to you.

For those who are not rushing off to airports on Sunday afternoon, the American Society of International Law Interest Group in Teaching International Law is planning a luncheon for persons interested in the ASIL and in teaching international law.  Contact me at intlawprof@gmail.com to RSVP so that we are sure to have enough space.  We plan to meet either in the AALS hotel or at a nearby restaurant at 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, January 6, 2008.  Thank you all, and see you soon in New York.

Mark E. Wojcik The John Marshall Law School-Chicago Chair, AALS Section on International Human Rights Law

Co-Chair, ASIL Interest Group in Teaching International Law

New Voices in Human Rights: Part 1 Friday, January 4, 2008 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.Hilton New York
Clinton Suite, Second Floor

Moderator:  Mark E. Wojcik, The John Marshall Law School-Chicago

Speakers:    Jenia Ionthcheva Turner, SMU Dedman School of Law (”Defense Perspectives on Law and Politics in International Criminal Trials”)

Lesley Wexler, Florida State University College of Law (”Human Rights Impact Statements”)

Jennifer Anglim Kreder, Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law (”A Nazi-Looted Art Tribunal”)

Leonard Cavise, DePaul University College of Law (”Taking U.S. Law Students to Chiapas, Mexico:  International Human Rights, Poverty Reduction, and Inspiring Students to Pursue Careers in International Human Rights”)

Michele Pistone, Villanova University School of Law (”The International Community’s Response to the Crisis Facing Iraqi Refugees”)

Saira Mohamed, Attorney-Advisor for Human Rights and Refugees, Office of the Legal Advisor, U.S. Department of State (”The Compatibility of State Responsibility for Genocide with the Methods and Goals of Transitional Justice”)

Theodore A. Myhre, University of Washington School of Law (”Advancing Same-Sex Civil Rights through Equity: The Meretricious Relationship Doctrine as an Alternative to Arguments Relying on Theories of Equal Rights and Liberty Interests”)

Darren Rosenblum, Pace Law School (”The Case for Abolishing CEDAW”)

Christiana Ochoa, Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington (”From Odious Debt to Odious Finance: Avoiding the Externalities of a Functional Odious Debt Doctrine”)

Commentator:  Robert C. Blitt, University of Tennessee College of Law

New Voices in Human Rights: Part 2 Sunday, January 6, 2008

9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon

Hilton New York – Nassau A Room – Second Floor

Moderators:  Robert C. Blitt, University of Tennessee College of Law

Arthur Acevedo, The John Marshall Law School-Chicago

Anthony S. Winer, William Mitchell College of Law

Speakers:    Susan Teifenbrun, Thomas Jefferson School of Law (”Child Soldiers, Slavery, and the Trafficking of Children”)

Susan H. Bitensky, Michigan State University College of Law (”Corporal Punishment of Children”)

Karen E. Bravo, Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis (”Toward a Labor Liberalization Solution to the Modern Traffic in Humans”)

Cheryl George, St. Mary’s University of San Antonio (”Global Sex Trafficking”)

John Mikhail, Georgetown University Law Center (”Cognitive Science and the Foundations of Human Rights”)

Peter G. Danchin, University of Maryland School of Law (”The Relationship of Religion and Human Rights in International Law Theory”)

Amy J. Cohen, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law (”Making Selves: Human Rights and Rule of Law Cultures”)

Sharon E. Foster, University of Arkansas School of Law-Fayetteville (”Ignorance and Want: A Human Rights Conflict Analysis Regarding Competing Interests in Health Care, Food, and Education”)

Benjamin G. Davis, University of Toledo College of Law (”Criminal Prosecution in U.S. Courts of High-Level U.S. Civilian Authority and Military Generals for Torture and Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment”)

Hannah Ruth Garry, University of Colorado Law School (”Reconciling Restorative and Retributive Justice Norms in International Criminal Law: Victims and the Right to Participate in International Proceedings”)

Arturo J. Carrillo (with Jason Palmer), George Washington University Law School (”Mass Claim Type Procedures (MCTPs) in International Law and Practice”)

James P. Eyster, Ave Maria School of Law (”Judging the Truth: A Comparison of Credibility Determinations for Asylum Claims in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, and the European Union”)

Matthew J. Lister, Law Clerk, U.S. Court of International Trade (”Who is a Refugee?”)

Program Chair:  Mark E. Wojcik, The John Marshall Law School-Chicago

New Voices in Human Rights: Part 3
Sunday, January 6, 2008
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Hilton New York – Clinton Suite – Second Floor

This panel is co-sponsored by the AALS Sections on International Human Rights and
the AALS Section on New Law Professors

Moderators:  Elizabeth A. Pendo, St. Thomas University School of Law and St. Louis University School of Law

Sergio Pareja, University of New Mexico School of Law

Joseph F. Morrissey, Stetson University College of Law

Mark E. Wojcik, The John Marshall Law School-Chicago

Speakers:    Milena Sterio, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law (”Globalization, Human Rights, and the Erosion of State Sovereignty”)

Robert D. Sloane, Boston University School of Law (”The Cost of Conflation: On the Dualism of Jus Ad Bellum and Jus in Bello“)

Carlos Iván Gorrin-Peralta, Inter-American University of Puerto Rico School of Law (”Colonial Constitutionalism Versus Self-Determination: Washington, You Have a Problem!”)

Barnali Choudhoury, Charleston School of Law (”The Façade of Neutrality: Implications of International Trade Politics on Women’s Rights”)

Gregory S. McNeal, Pennsylvania State University, The Dickinson School of Law (”Toward a Predictive Theory of Executive Forum Discretion in Counterterrorism”)

Jane E. Cross, Shepard Broad Law Center Nova Southeastern University (”The Mandatory Death Penalty in the Commonwealth Caribbean: A Chronicle of Death Foretold?”)

Jeffrey D. Kahn, SMU Dedman School of Law (”Thoughts Toward Protection of a Right to International Travel”)

Timothy K. Kuhner, Duke University School of Law and Roger Williams University School of Law (”The Democracy to Which We Are Entitled: Human Rights and the Problem of Money in Politics”)

Cleveland Ferguson III, Florida Coastal School of Law (”U.N. Millennium Development Goals and State Capacity: Shifting the Focus of Donor Programs to the Public Interest”)

Joseph M. Isanga, Ave Maria School of Law “United Nations Resolutions Relative to Efforts Aimed at Combating International Terrorism: An Emerging Norm of Customary International Law and Jus Cogens

Brian J. Foley, Drexel University College of Law (”This is an Emergency: Re-seeing the Jus ad Bellum through a Human Rights Lens”)

Program Chair:  Mark E. Wojcik, The John Marshall Law School-Chicago